SOS!Editor-In-Chief: Hannah Bieber (2020-2021)

Have you ever wondered what being part of The Euroculturer is like? In this mini-series, former editors-in-chief will reiterate upon their experiences as a Euroculture student and the impact that being part of the Euroculturer has had on their professional career! In this third edition, Hannah Bieber (2019/2021, Uppsala and Göttingen) will tell you all about her experiences!

The Euroculturer Magazine (EM): Out of the universities you have attended, which one did you enjoy the most (and why)?

Hannah Bieber (HB): Uppsala because I had the best two semester I could have possibly wished for. I learned a lot about myself there and I made wonderful friends who made me grow immensely, so I am forever grateful to have chosen this university. Also, Sweden is breath-taking: it has a lot to offer if you like nature and winter wonderland-like landscapes.

EM: What did you do in your third semester? What is the most valuable thing you learned during your research/professional track?

HB: I did a professional track, an internship at EUNIC (European Union National Insitutes for Culture) Brussels. The most valuable thing I learned was definitely how to make international cultural projects happen, from the idea to the implementation. It was a very comprehensive experience which has taught me a lot of useful project management skills.

EM: Why did you decide to become part of The Euroculturer team, and how long were you active?

HB: I’m passionate about writing and I’ve always been interested in the media. So, when I learned there was a student magazine handled by Euroculture students, I immediately applied to join the team. I started as an editor from October 2019 until August 2020, and then became editor in chief until August 2021.

EM: About what did you write your Master thesis?

 HB: My thesis is titled: The impossible homecoming? A Study of the Evolution of the French Government’s Discourses on French ISIS returnees between 2017 and can be placed in the field of Broad field: Counter-terrorism/Counter-extremism studies.

EM: What did you do the year after graduating Euroculture, and could you tell us more about your experiences during this period fresh out of university?

HB: After graduating, I did a short three-months internship at the University of Leiden where I worked as a research assistant for a program a Horizon 2020 project called Drive – Resisting Radicalisation through Social Inclusion. Afterwards, I did a bluebook traineeship at the European Commission in the Education and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA).

EM: What are you currently doing?

HB: I am currently working at the French Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan. I’m working half-time at the Cultural Action and Cooperation Service and half-time at the Alliance française of Islamabad, where I am course coordinator.

EM: In hindsight, how has your experience of working with The Euroculturer been helpful for your post-graduate career?

HB: It has been extremely useful! I tried to use this experience the best that I could on my CV and in my motivation letters to show my writing, communication, project management and leadership skills. In my job interviews, I always got asked questions about the magazine, what it was and the role that I played in it. I am convinced that this experience was a great asset in my internship/job-hunting processes.

EM: Based on your experiences, why would it be useful for current Euroculture students to become involved in the Euroculturer?

HB: First of all, becoming involved in the Euroculturer gives you the opportunity to meet so many Euroculture students and alumni, which makes you feel like you are part of an amazing community. It also taught me teamwork and how to be creative and organized. On top of that, it was my very first experience in managing a team, which was sometimes challenging, but I feel like I learned a lot from it. In fact, I have always considered my time at the Euroculturer as a true professional experience, even though it was in a university context.

The Euroculturer also gives you the opportunity to try things that you might have been interested in for a long time but which you never got the chance to do – creating content for social media, writing and proofreading articles, organizing events, doing interviews, etc. So it’s a great way of learning more about yourself and what you like/don’t like to do.

And finally, the reason why I would recommend students to get involved with the Euroculturer is because it is first and foremost a media by and for the Euroculture students, who can turn it into whatever they want it to be. It has taken so many shapes and forms over the years depending on the various editors in chief and teams, which is the proof that it is really up to the students to take it in the direction that they want. I can only recommend embarking on that adventure! 


For the full Euroculturer 10th Anniversary Special: Click here!

SOS!Editor-in-Chief: Guilherme Becker (2019-2020)

Have you ever wondered what being part of The Euroculturer is like? In this mini-series, former editors-in-chief will reiterate upon their experiences as a Euroculture student and the impact that being part of the Euroculturer has had on their professional career! In this second edition, Guilherme Becker (2018/2020, Göttingen and Groningen) will tell you about his experiences.

The Euroculturer Magazine (EM): Out of the universities you have attended, which one did you enjoy the most (and why)?

Guilherme Becker (GB): I honestly liked – and could improve my knowledge in – both of them. What I perceive now is how good Göttingen had at that time prepared me in the first semester to go to Groningen, for example. The learnings of both of them have some different paths, I would say, along with their peculiarities and deadlines, but it seemed worthwhile to me having had a very good introduction in Göttingen and then going to a quite different system in Groningen, where I was able to improve especially my theoretical perception.

EM: What did you do in your third semester? What is the most valuable thing you learned during your research/professional track?

GB: I did two different internships. The first one at Deutsche Welle, in Bonn, Germany, from October to December 2019, and the second one at a newspaper called Thüringer Allgemeine, in Erfurt, also in Germany, from January to March 2020 – and then the world went upside down because of the pandemics…

Well, as a journalist, the most valuable thing I learnt was the fact that I could put some experiences into practice and, at the same time, work in a German newsroom – or a German journalistic environment, which is simultaneously quite similar and quite different compared to the experiences I previously had in Brazil. I mean, the fact that I could write my thoughts in German for the first time and, while in Erfurt, witnessing the Thüringen state election of 2020, when moderate parties sealed an alliance with a far-right party for the first time in German history since the Second World War was something intense. You can read what I wrote about it here.

EM: Why did you decide to become part of The Euroculturer team, and how long were you active?

GB: Because I am a journalist and I love writing and editing, and I thought I would be able to help the team in some way, bringing interesting ideas and talking to classmates to write about issues and analysis from their countries, regions, backgrounds, experiences, which in the end I think I could accomplish somehow. I worked as editor from October 2018 until July 2019, when I became editor-in-chief until the end of Euroculture, in August 2020.

EM: About what did you write your Master thesis?

GB: My thesis is titled: Back in Germany: identity and cultural perspectives of German-Brazilians in their ancestors’ land. As the title already tells, I tried to explore the identity and cultural perspectives of Brazilians who hold German citizenship because of their ancestors, based on German citizenship laws. I interviewed five German-Brazilians (qualitatively) who had been living in Germany at least for a year (at that time) and then crossed those information with identity, culture and migration theories. So, basically, these people are doing the reverse way their ancestors once did. Anyway, they immigrated. They are officially Germans, but they are actually Brazilians. They are both. They are Brazilians who live in Germany, but hold the local citizenship. Do they feel completely at home? Are they seen as foreigners? Do they carry the cultural boundaries their ancestors once brought to Brazil? Because regarding papers and documents, they are officially Germans living in Germany. But are they really? Do they feel completely at home or there’s a lack of sense of belonging, identity and culture, in regard to their immigration background? Those are some of the questions I asked and tried to answer after comparing their answers with theories aforementioned.

Continue reading “SOS!Editor-in-Chief: Guilherme Becker (2019-2020)”

SOS!Editor-In-Chief: Maeva Berghmans (2018-2019)

Have you ever wondered what being part of The Euroculturer is like? In this new mini-series, former editors-in-chief will reiterate upon their experiences as a Euroculture student and the impact that being part of the Euroculturer has had on their professional career! In this first edition, Maeva Berghmans (2017/2019, Olomouc and Kraków) will tell you all about her experiences!

The Euroculturer Magazine (EM): Out of the universities you have attended, which one did you enjoy the most (and why)?

Maeva Berghmans (MB): I have wonderful memories in both cities and at both universities, to be honest. Yes, I might have preferred Olomouc because it was closer to the type of cities I enjoy living in, but my favourite place to study for hours was Krakow. I miss the latter regularly, especially in Spring – which is perhaps the best season to visit this part of Poland. However, by the end of the first semester, Olomouc truly felt like home. 

EM: What did you do in your third semester? What is the most valuable thing you learned during your research/professional track?

MB: I did a research track! It might seem slightly boring, but: that all your teachers are part of your professional network. I picked classes that would widen my network, as well as give me the chance to see more teaching styles – a sort of preparation for what was coming next for me, since I was orienting myself towards an academic career. Also, that medieval history is probably the least well taught subject in secondary school in France, but that’s another story…! 

EM: Why did you decide to become part of The Euroculturer team, and how long were you active?

MB: To be honest, I am used to doing multiple things at the same time. Back in September 2017, I decided that for once, I would focus solely on one thing: my master studies. By the end of the 1st year, I had taken part in one election observation mission, chaired two MEU simulations, and I became The Euroculturer’s editor-in-chief. I just saw it as a nice opportunity to give back to the Euroculture community while making good use of my skills in online PR and digital communications! I became editor-in-chief around May 2018 until somewhere in summer 2019.

EM: About what did you write your Master thesis?

MB: My thesis is titled: ‘Pravda vítězí’: The Czech Victimisation Narrative and the Creation of the First Czechoslovak Republic in the Beginning of the Twentieth Century and it can be placed in the field of Czech History and Nationalism (First World War).

EM: What did you do the year after graduating Euroculture, and could you tell us more about your experiences during this period fresh out of university?

GB: First, I flew back home and helped with the last preparations for my sister’s wedding, then took some ‘time off’ heading back to Olomouc to attend their summer school in Slavonic studies (intensive Czech classes). Then, I started a PhD in History at Palacký University, so I very much stayed in Olomouc – not exactly out of university, though definitely a different ‘angle’ of university life. 

Continue reading “SOS!Editor-In-Chief: Maeva Berghmans (2018-2019)”