City Lifestyle: Student Nations

By Leonie Glaser

Besides having a high-ranking university, beautiful old buildings, and being surrounded by nature, Uppsala has a vibrant student life, unlike any other Euroculture City. The reason? Student Nations! This article will tell you everything you need to know about these Swedish traditional clubs – from the stairs in front of Värmlands to the fancy Gasques – a membership at a nation will define your Uppsala student life!

So, what are these nations? Student Nations are old student associations with their own bars, nightclubs, and restaurants, which are entirely run by students. They organise activities and have clubs ranging from choirs to sports, and from theatre to orchestra. The nations in Uppsala date back to 1630 and the names of the nations (for example, Stockholms Nation, Göteborgs Nation, and Värmlands Nation) give away their origin. The clubs were for students from certain areas of Sweden to meet people from their own region and feel a bit like home again. Nowadays, coming from a certain district is not necessary for membership anymore and even international students can join whichever nation they like!

Continue reading “City Lifestyle: Student Nations”

SOSEurocompetences II: Alessandra Pantanosas

First-semester students don’t have a lot of information yet about Eurocompetence II in the second semester. To give first-semester students insight into what they can expect from their second semester, the SOS Eurocompetence II series introduces students who have done the subject already. This interview is held with Alessandra Pantanosas (nickname: Sandi), a current third-semester Euroculture student. She did her first semester in Strasbourg, and her second semester – and with that Eurocompetence II – in Groningen. It has to be noted that the semester from January 2021 till June 2021 was fully online due to Corona.

Interview by Laila M. Lange.

What did you know about Eurocompetence II before starting the course in Groningen?

I only had a vague idea about it. I was aware that the course focuses on project management, but I didn’t know how it would be taught or approached, especially knowing that it would be held online. I couldn’t imagine implementing a project from behind a screen and being graded for it.

Could you shortly outline what Eurocompetence II entailed in your second semester?

Eurocompetence II wasn’t like our other classes or research seminars. We didn’t meet as a class often. It was more focused on meeting with our groupmates in our own time. There was, however, a class after every “milestone” (or big submission). These few classes were great opportunities to share ideas and gather input from our other classmates. However, these classes weren’t like typical sit-down lectures. They were more like sessions to give progress reports and peer reviews.

We didn’t have any exams. Instead, we had to submit a project plan and a few other group papers to show our progress every few weeks. All the deadlines were given at the beginning of the semester, so there were no surprises throughout the semester. As for workload, we had control over this, to an extent, because we defined the scope and limitations of our projects.

In addition, the deadlines for the papers were fairly spread throughout the semester. It’s completely manageable. Our groups also got to decide the implementation dates for our respective projects. The only condition was they fell within a range of dates, but the range was quite large. So, we pretty much made our own deadlines.

Continue reading “SOSEurocompetences II: Alessandra Pantanosas”

Interview with Marcella Zandonai: The International Youth Conference in Krusevo

Interview conducted by Lina Mansour.

Marcella Zandonai is a Euroculture alumni (cohort 2015-2017) from Trento, Italy. She spent her first semester at the University of Göttingen, Germany, and continued her Euroculture studies in Bilbao, Spain. After doing some volunteering, travelling in New Zealand, and working for a local NGO in Trento, she joined Euroculture again in 2020 as the Assistant Coordinator at the University of Göttingen. You can read more about Marcella’s work here.

1. Tell us a little bit about the conference and its objective!

The International Youth Conference was created 19 years ago from a local Macedonian NGO called Youth Alliance Krusevo. Krusevo — the city where the conference is held — is one of the highest cities of the Balkan region (1350 meters) and is a very nice location, where nature and culture meet each other. The main objective of the conference is to gather “the most active young people from 16 countries to work together for the European future of the Western Balkans Region”. This year’s topic was “European values for the future for SEE region – Regional Transformation”. The main focus of the Conference was on the European integration of the Western Balkans and it had 5 thematic areas:

  1. Regional Transformation
  2. Securing the European future of the region
  3. Youth-led transformation of the integrative politics of the region
  4. Sustainable and digital transformation of the region
  5. How much does the future cost?

The Conference was divided into three days of frontal presentations on the five thematic areas and two days of group work and brainstorming to come up with concrete policies: one for each area.

Continue reading “Interview with Marcella Zandonai: The International Youth Conference in Krusevo”

SOSJobs! Alumni4Students: Francesca Brandi (2015-2017)

Interview by Marcella Zandonai
Edited and published by Lina Mansour

From Cultural Studies to teaching in Latin America, to going back to Italy and building up new opportunities

Present yourself and your university career in a few words

I am Francesca Brandi, I am 29 years old and I am from Brescia, Italy. Since I was a teenager I had a passion for languages, traveling, and discovering new cultures. Therefore, I decided to study for a Bachelor’s degree in Foreign Languages and Literatures at the University of Bergamo. The second year I applied for the Erasmus grant and I went to Spain where I studied for a whole year at the Complutense University of Madrid. Once I got my degree, I did an internship in Argentina, where I taught English to pupils and I collaborated in different activities with teenagers from disadvantaged areas. Before starting my MA, I took another year to get to know another country: a full year in New York City working as Au-pair. After that, I flew to Göttingen where I started my MA in Euroculture. My second university was Deusto, Spain, followed by a research track in Mexico City and then the final semester in Göttingen again. Once I completed my MA in Euroculture in 2017 I came back to Mexico where I lived until February 2020. Right now, I am living in Italy, I am working for an NGO and at the same time, I am studying for another MA in Translation and Publishing.

Continue reading “SOSJobs! Alumni4Students: Francesca Brandi (2015-2017)”

IP 2020: Between Changing Europe and Collecting Miles

This article is part of the IP 2020 series, in which we publish abridged, general-public versions of the academic papers presented in the Euroculture Intensive Programme. This year’s topic was Sustainability.

Lea Marie Quilitz graduated from Euroculture in 2021 after spending semesters in Strasbourg, Uppsala and Göttingen. Since the IP 2020 sparked her interest in the topic of sustainability, she not only wrote her master’s thesis in this area, but also intends to dedicate her professional life to sustainable development.

By Lea Marie Quilitz

Between changing Europe and collecting miles: Students’ CO2 emissions resulting from air travel as an indicator for the environmental sustainability of the Euroculture program

Climate change is one of the world’s major concerns in the twenty-first century. Sustainability, or more precisely, environmental sustainability (ES), as a concept is widely considered as the solution to fight the dramatic effects of global warming that result from emission of greenhouse gases (GHG). The most prominent of these gases is probably carbon dioxide (CO2) which results inter alia from the use of internal combustion engines. Consequently, large amounts of CO2 can be associated with air travel which represents one of the means of transport most frequently used by students who participate in international mobility. The Master’s degree Euroculture is a program that offers an international study experience by allowing students to be enrolled in at least two European universities and to get into contact with students and staff from all over the world. However, the grand mobility of the program results in frequent relocation of students who often travel by plane to reach their next destination. As aviation is mostly considered an unsustainable way of traveling, the present study evaluates the ES of the Euroculture program measured by the calculated CO2 emissions caused by students’ study related air travel. Having said this, this study and its findings do not claim to be representative but present a case study to provide impulses for further examination on the subject. To give further insights on students’ travel habits and their opinions on the climate change debate, a survey additionally asked about the level of awareness and self-reflection regarding their mobile lifestyle.

Continue reading “IP 2020: Between Changing Europe and Collecting Miles”

Welcome to Euroculture!

September is here and a new semester is about to begin. To help out new students navigate their Euroculture life, we have prepared a special Welcome Kit, which you may download below.

Now is the perfect moment to reach out to fellow students and start making connections before the semester begins! Try reaching out to fellow first-semester colleagues, or perhaps to 3rd-semester students who might be staying at your city; check out Facebook and WhatsApp groups and try connecting with others after you arrive in your new city but before classes start. Trust us, it will make your experience much more enjoyable.

We wish everyone a great new semester. Follow us on social media for regular updates on Euroculture and feel free to contact us should you have any questions or suggestions!

IP 2021: Concordat versus laïcité – the case of Alsace-Moselle

This article is part of the IP 2021 series, in which we publish abridged, general-public versions of the academic papers presented in the Euroculture Intensive Programme. This year’s topic was Religion.

Anna Wierzbicka is a Polish student who spent her first semester in Strasbourg and her second one in Groningen.

By Anna Oliwia Wierzbicka

On ne touche pas aux choses d’Alsace.

“Do not change anything in Alsace.” These words, attributed to the king Louis XIV, may never have been expressed by him, but they can be seen as  evidence of the specific attitude of the French crown towards Alsace over the centuries. This attitude has lasted to this day, to the times of the French Fifth Republic. And one of its manifestations is the Concordat of 1801, which regulates the relationship between the state and four religious denominations in Alsace-Moselle (a region that consists of three departments: Haut-Rhin, Bas-Rhin and Moselle) until this day. It is still in force despite the adoption of the State secularism in France in 1905 by the French Law on the Separation of the Churches and State (Loi du 9 décembre 1905 concernant la séparation des Églises et de l’État), prohibiting any influence of the State on religious matters and vice versa. 

Continue reading “IP 2021: Concordat versus laïcité – the case of Alsace-Moselle”

SOSJobs! Alumni4Students: Virginia Stuart-Taylor (2016-2018)

Virginia Stuart-Taylor is British and was part of the Euroculture 2016-2018 cohort, but graduated in 2019 due to undertaking a full-time job. She spent her first semester at the University of Groningen, her second one at Uppsala University and chose the professional track in the third semester. Before starting Euroculture, she completed a BA in Spanish, Italian and Portuguese at the University of Exeter. Currently, she is living in London (UK) where she is working in the UK Government on UK-EU trade relations and negotiations. Virginia always wanted to pursue a Master’s degree and explore Europe further, therefore the Euroculture M.A. was a perfect fit. Apart from moving to Europe, she wanted to shift her career towards the public sector. Ultimately, pursuing the Euroculture M.A. was a fundamental step in her career, as it enabled her to re-orient towards politics, public affairs and foreign policy.

Euroculturer Magazine (EM):  What were your expectations when you applied/started the Euroculture M.A. and do they match the reality at the moment? 

Virgina Stuart Taylor (VST): I started the Euroculture M.A. shortly after the UK’s Brexit referendum and, as I’m British, the vote added a certain element of drama to the course. I was excited to study among so many different nationalities, after 4 years predominantly working full-time in London. I was so thrilled about the freedom of the student experience that I over-subscribed to practically everything Groningen had to offer: Dutch and Russian classes, the Honours College, a Photography course and even some ad-hoc paid work for Study in Holland.  I quickly discovered that the MA course at Groningen is really demanding too, so I did struggle to find time for everything. I learned my lesson and was subsequently more realistic with my extracurricular activities in Uppsala for the second semester. Despite that, I was thrilled that the course was so rigorous, as it meant I learned quickly and absorbed a lot of knowledge, which I’ve used in my jobs after graduation. Following the Brexit referendum, there has been a lot of demand in the UK job market for expertise in European Affairs. While studying though, I tentatively hoped I might settle in the EU with a residency and work permit. Fast forward 4 years and I’ve used my Euroculture experience to start a career in the UK Government, specialising in UK-EU relations and negotiations, and I unfortunately no longer have the right to work in the EU. My network of friends and contacts in the EU is huge however, both in Brussels and spread across the continent, and I catch up with many of my Euroculture friends when visiting Brussels for work. I would ideally like to have a more accessible route and the right to work in the EU again, but I’m also happy that my career has remained EU-focused, even when I’m physically based in London.

Continue reading “SOSJobs! Alumni4Students: Virginia Stuart-Taylor (2016-2018)”

Keeping your Eurocompetence project alive — United Citizens of Europe

Luca, Anton and Hannah are all part of the 2019-2021 cohort. Luca studied in Groningen in his first semester, Anton in Krakow and Hannah in Uppsala. They all three got to know each other during their second semester in Strasbourg. All three decided to pursue the professional track in their third semester, leaving them spread across the continent: Luca in Sofia, Hannah in Geneva and Anton in Berlin. They are all co-founders of United Citizens of Europe and each brings a different expertise to the project.

Euroculturer Magazine (EM): Hi Luca, Anton and Hannah. Tell us a bit more about how the United Citizens of Europe project came into being and what you are trying to accomplish.

United Citizens of Europe (UCoE): The original idea behind United Citizens of Europe was to have a MEU (Model European Union) on European Citizenship and golden visas. The pandemic forced us to change our format and our overall initial idea. In the end, we decided to carry out live interviews on Instagram, hosting guests with a relevant background in the European institutional and civil society sector. The original team was composed of five members; only two of us are still here. When contemplating whether or not to continue with the project, we knew we wanted Anton to join because of his creative mind and attention to detail.

Continue reading “Keeping your Eurocompetence project alive — United Citizens of Europe”

Behind the scenes: meet the Euroculture Staff – Marcella Zandonai

Interview conducted by Johanna Pieper & Paola Gosio

Marcella Zandonai is an Euroculture alumni (cohort 2015-2017) from Trento, Italy. She spent her first semester at the University of Göttingen, Germany, and continued her Euroculture studies in Bilbao, Spain. After doing some volunteering, travelling in New Zealand and working for a local NGO in Trento, she joined Euroculture again in 2020 as the Assistant Coordinator at the University of Göttingen.

Euroculture Magazine (EM): What were your expectations when you applied/started your job position as professor or coordinator and does it match the reality?

Marcella Zandonai (MZ): I have to say that I started my job in a very unrealistic period of our Earth´s life. The 2020 health crisis completely changed my perception and my work tasks as well. When I started, there were actually hints of a return to normal life around July 2020. However, a couple of months later, the virus came back and I started working remotely
I only had a vague idea of how my job was supposed to be, since I did my MA in Euroculture as well. I was seeing my (now) ex-colleagues doing a lot of work, being outside, traveling, being with students, and enjoying themselves. I supposed that in a utopian world my job would be hectic and I would be always on the move, meeting up with people and exchanging smiles with students. 

So, my answer is: no, the job expectations did not match reality. But unfortunately, there is no one to blame. Maybe it would be easier if there was but…oh well: such is life.

When I applied I thought that the first wave would have been the first and only. But then this turned out not to be the case. We are living in uncertain times.

Continue reading “Behind the scenes: meet the Euroculture Staff – Marcella Zandonai”